Resources


On this page:

Resources for older adults and intergenerational programs:

ChangingAging: Exploring life beyond adulthood – A multi-blog platform challenging conventional views on aging and seeing aging as a strength. Dr. Bill Thomas is a leader in the field and the founder of the Eden Alternative.

Connecting Generations: Integrating Aging Education and Intergenerational Programs with Elementary and Middle Grade Curricula. Needham, MA: Allyn and Bacon, 1999. A book by Barbara M. Friedman that serves as a comprehensive guide for teachers.

Generations United – Their mission is to improve the lives of children, youth and older people through intergenerational collaboration, public policies and programs.

Grandparents on About.com – Resources for grandparents’ rights, multi-generational living, exercise, nutrition, things to do with grandchildren, and family celebrations.

The Legacy Project is a multi-generational education initiative and their program Legacy Cubed focuses on how we all evolve our legacy over our lifetime. Intergenerational programs for parents, grandparents and educators.

Penn State Intergenerational Program offers a vast array of resources for intergenerational programs–including curricula and activities for all ages, research, and inspiring articles.

Societal Education about Aging for Change – Washington DC Center on Aging program shines a spotlight on media produced for children and images of age.

This Chair Rocks and “Yo, is this Ageist?” Two great blogs by Ashton Applewhite who has been speaking out against ageism since 2007. They are both insightful and thought provoking–“Go ahead. Ask her.”

Time Goes By – Long time elder blogger Ronni Bennett shares terrific insights on growing older. A site chock full of information.

Vital Aging Network – Promoting self-determination, civic engagement, and personal growth for people as they age.

Resources for writers:

Society for Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI)
Michigan chapter at www.kidsbooklink.org

The Loft Literary Center

Institute for Children’s Literature

KidLitosphere Central Society of Bloggers

Cynthialeitichsmith.com for Youth Lit Resources

Books on aging for adults:

Applewhite, Ashton. This Chair Rocks: A Manifesto Against Ageism. New York: Networked Books, 2016.

Bateson, Mary Catherine. Composing a Further Life. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2010.

Butler, Robert N., M.D. The Longevity Revolution: The Benefits and Challenges of Living a Long Life. New York: Public Affairs Press, 2008.

Cohen, Gene D., M.D. The Creative Age: Awakening Human Potential in the Second Half of Life. New York: Avon Books, 2000.

Cohen, Gene D., M.D. The Mature Mind: The Positive Power of the Aging Brain. New York: Basic Books, 2005.

Dychtwald, Ken. Healthy Aging: Challenges and Solutions. Aspen Publishing, 1999.

Friedan, Betty. The Fountain of Age. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1993.

Goldman, Connie, and Richard Mahler. Secrets of Becoming a Late Bloomer: staying creative, aware and involved in midlife and beyond. Fairview Press, 2007.

Gullette, Margaret Morganroth. AGEWISE: Fighting the New Ageism in America. University of Chicago Press, 2011.

Gurian, Michael. The Wonder of Aging. Atria/Simon and Schuster, 2013.

Loe, Meika. Aging Our Way: Lessons for Living from 85 and Beyond. Oxford University Press, 2011.

Pipher, Mary. Another Country: Navigating the Emotional Terrain of our Elders. New York: Riverhead Books, 1999.

Rowe, John W. and Robert L. Kahn. Successful Aging: The MacArthur Foundation Study shows you how the lifestyle choices you make now—more than heredity—determine your health and vitality. New York: Pantheon Books, 1998.

Schacter-Shalomi, Zalman and Ronald S. Miller. From Age-ing to Sage-ing: A Profound New Vision of Growing Older. New York: Warner Books, 1997.

Thomas, William H., M.D. What are Old People For?: How Elders Will Save the World. St.Louis, Missouri: Vander Wyck and Burnham, 2004.

Thomas, William H., M.D. Second Wind: Navigating the Passage to a Slower, Deeper, more Connected Life. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2014.

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